Indian River Lagoon (IRL) Phenology (June-August)

Books, Books & Products, Great Outdoors, In The News23 Comments

Off the Indian River Lagoon Coast beaches, Randy Walker with a good-size, over-limit snook, with Rusty Walker looking on!

Off the Indian River Lagoon Coast beaches, Randy Walker with a good-size, over-limit snook, with brother Rusty Walker looking on!

I took this from my book; Enjoying Life on the Indian River Lagoon Coast.

The Indian River Lagoon is nearly 170 miles long, and over its entire length, the timing of the IRL’s phenology varies from region-to-region. The IRL is a complex system, one composed of multiple lagoons, rivers, human-made inlets, mangrove forests and a host of other unique habitats.

Enjoying Life on the Indian River Lagoon Coast

Because of its geographic location relative to the Gulf Stream, the IRL system is a rare gem. Being super rich in biodiversity, its watershed stretches over temperate, semi-tropical and tropical regions.

Here is the monthly information for summertime on the diversity of it’s many ecosystems.

June

  • Great Southern White Butterflies, ascia monuste roam the beaches and Lagoon.
  • Red drum, sciaenops ocellatus begin to mate.
  • The official start of the “Dog Days of Summer”.
  • Go ahead and kayak from the beach, it’s the perfect time of year.
  • At times, look for sharks to be thick in the surf – be aware and cautious, but don’t let them stop you.
  • Take advantage of catching a snook, centropomus undecimalis in the surf.
  • Remember, the longest day of the year is June 21st; good riddance hot weather?

 

The Pipevine, Aristolochialittoralis attracts the pipevine swallowtail, Battus philenor

The Pipevine, Aristolochia littoralis attracts the pipevine swallowtail, Battus philenor

 

  • The sea oat uniola paniculata beach sunflower, Helianthus debilis railroad vine, ipomoea pes-caprae and other coastal flowers reach full bloom.

  • Gulf, sinus passeres and southern flounder, paralichthys lethostigma moving along beaches and inlets

 

Jake Smith, jigging Gulf founder, sinus passeres from our Indian River Lagoon Coast beaches.

Jake Smith, jigging Gulf founder from our Indian River Lagoon Coast beaches.

Gulf, sinus passeres and southern flounder, paralichthys lethostigma moving along beaches and inlets.

July

  • The wind is blowing out of the southeast.
  • Upwelling comes to surf, and water is cold.
  • Sometimes in the summer the water is gin clear in the surf, so it’s an excellent opportunity to go diving or snorkeling.

ocean-underwater-light

  • Mangrove (gray) snapper, lutjanus griseus are best in July/August.
  • Tarpon, megalops atlanticus are BIG and small, too!
  • Honey bees are roam over blooming black mangroves, avicennia germinans.
Mangrove (gray) snapper, Lutjanus griseus, is best in July/August.

Mangrove (gray) snapper are best in July/August.

 

August

Five females species of sea turtles grace our beaches during the mating season (March to October); loggerhead, caretta caretta, green turtle, chelonia mydas, Leatherback, dermochelys coriacea, Kemp’s Ridley, lepidochelys kempi and Hawkbill, eretmochelys imbricata. They are a sight to see laying their clutches (eggs)!

Dr. Karen Holloway, is holding up a juvenile green turtle, some of them live in the nearshore reefs at this life-stage.

Dr. Karen Holloway, is holding up a juvenile green turtle, some of them live in the nearshore reefs at this life-stage.

Barracuda Sphyraena barracuda, come inshore to spawn.

Barracuda, sphyraena barracuda come inshore to spawn.

  • Finger mullet, mugil cephalus reach the surf and with it a great migration of fish.
  • Hurricane season is nearly peaking at the end of August.
  • Bioluminescence is in full bloom in the Lagoon.

 

Bioluminescence

The sharks are thick.

Captain John Kumiski get the photo credit. John always has the camera ready!

Captain John Kumiski get the photo credit. John always has the camera ready!

Fall season surf is starting to pick up.

It's me!

It’s me!

 

23 Comments on “Indian River Lagoon (IRL) Phenology (June-August)”

  1. Ted Moorhead

    Thank you Rodney for the interesting stories and information about our precious water resources.

  2. Tom Altif

    Thank you Rodney for leading the charge in protecting our natural resources, the “Real Florida.”

  3. Walt Koenig

    I don’t know how you got my name and e-mail address, but I enjoyed your pictures and commentaries.

    Thank you,

    Walt

    1. admin

      Walt: You’re on my list.Look up anglersforconservation.org. Thank you! Rod

      Rodney Smith
      President, Anglers for Conservation
      rodneysmithmedia.com

      @IrlcoastSmith
      P.O. Box 372423, Satellite Beach, FL 32937
      Phone: (321) 750-3374
      anglersforconservation.org

  4. DW

    Liked your Blog Rodney…Especially the picture of the Walker Brothers on that epic day of snook fishing off the beach! :)

Leave a Reply to DW Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


six + 7 =